Archive | September 2013

Suman Malagkit (Sticky Rice Roll in Banana Leaves)

Finally, I’ve made it! It was a week ago when my son asked me to cook suman (he actually remembered the one that Lola Juling used to gave him the last time we’re home). I was begging him to eat biko instead but he wants the unsweetened version of suman wrapped in banana leaves. In as much as I wanted to cook it right away I waited for Friday (our market day) to look for those precious leaves. I was lucky enough to have found the last bunch of almost wilted banana leaves in the supermarket (a rare find I must say) and the next day I got to work on it before it gets really dry.

Suman is actually an inexpensive and a very easy rice rolls recipe to make, most of the flavor comes from the banana leaf wrapping thus, no artificial flavoring is needed. When I think of this delicacy I would miss my grandma. I grew up seeing here making varieties of banana leaf wrapped suman and sell it for a living, just like “lidgid” or the grated cassava or (camote)sweet potatoes, suman sa lihiya and suman moron but the most memorable way she used it for were these sticky (glutinous) rice of which is my favorite. Also on special occasions like New Year, Christmas and fiestas during my childhood, these delicacies were always present and many would say that my grandma was one of the best suman maker in town.

So here’s my take on making Suman for the first time and am glad I finally did it! By the way suman is best serve with sugar, latik, sweetened grated coconut (bukayo) or ripe mango, you can choose whatever suits you good from those but personally I prefer ripe mango if available.

Suman Malagkit

Suman Malagkit

Ingredients

  • 2 cups glutinous rice, soaked in water for 2 to 3 hrs.
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 cups fresh or canned coconut milk
  • banana leaves for wrapping
  • water for boiling

Cooking Instructions

  1. Remove the water from the rice by straining, then place it in a pot with the coconut milk and salt.  Bring to a boil, stir and immediately lower the heat to the lowest setting and stir occasionally to minimize rice from sticking on the pot.  Let is simmer for 20 minutes then turn the heat off. Don’t open the pot, leave it for another 15 to 30 minutes to finish cooking and to cool down.
  2. For the wrapping, pass the banana leaves over an open flame very quickly. This process will release the aroma of the leaves and will make them soft and flexible. Cut the leaves by making equal number of small pieces or depending on what size of roll you want  your suman.
  3. Wrap the rice as tight as possible and fold the sides.  Tie two pcs. of suman with folded sides inward  (as shown on the picture) or you may wrap 6 pieces or more again with a larger piece if you still have extra leaves to serve as double protection.
  4. In a steamer, stack the suman and steam for around 30 minutes to one hour over boiling water. Make sure they are tender before removing them from the steamer.
  5. Allow it to cool before unwrapping so that it will firm up.
  6. Serve with sugar, sweetened grated coconut, latik  or ripe mango. Share & enjoy!
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Shrimp Zucchini in Oyster Sauce

Shrimp Zucchini in Oyster Sauce

Zucchini or marrows as they call it here is a dark or light green squash vegetable, usually grown abundantly in summer. I always find huge pile of it in supermarkets here which made me curious of its taste and preparation.

Just recently I’ve discovered zucchini, being  cooked as accompaniment to any meat/seafood products, with other vegetables  or as the main ingredient itself. This  was my first time to incorporate zucchini with shrimp in my cooking  and it turned out to become a savory dish. I did call it Shrimp Zucchini in Oyster Sauce, please find recipe below:

Shrimp Zucchini in Oyster Sauce

Shrimp Zucchini in Oyster Sauce

Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb. medium shrimp, peeled & deveined
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1small size red bell pepper, seeded & thinly sliced crosswise
  • 4 medium zucchini, halved lengthwise and then sliced
  • 1/2 cup water
  • Salt, pepper & maggi magic sarap to taste
  • 2 tablespoons olive or any cooking oil

Cooking Procedure

  1. Sprinkle some salt and pepper on the shrimp. Let stand for 10 minutes.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a pan
  3. Pan-Fry the shrimp for 1 minute on both side. Mix in onions and stir.
  4. Add oyster sauce, soy sauce and maggi magic sarap. Stir and then cook covered for 2 minutes then add water.
  5. Put-in the zucchini and bell pepper, add salt as necessary. Stir, and then cook for 5 minutes until most of the liquid evaporates.
  6. Transfer to a serving plate. Serve hot with steamed rice. Enjoy!

Pinaputok na Isda

Sounds fiery! Quite appropriate with the current climate here in the Gulf but wait it’s only the fish we’re exploding here. “Pinaputok” means fired, popped, or exploded, honestly I really don’t know why the recipe is called as such since it doesn’t really pop. I first tasted the dish in a Filipino restaurant here and it was the cream dory they’ve used. Today I wanted something not oily and simply grilled for lunch so I thought this is just perfect. Traditionally, some uses whole fish such as tilapia, milkfish or pompano filled with chopped tomatoes, onions and ginger then wrapped in banana leaves. I don’t have any banana leaves here so I wrapped it in a foil and put it over an electric grill. I have experimented using nile perch fillet to save me from cleaning and deboning while feeding my little one (happy that he’s beginning to like grilled fish nowadays). Here’s my version of the dish:

Pinaputok na Isda

Pinaputok na Isda

Ingredients

  • 1/2 kg. Nile Perch Fillet (sliced into 3 portions)
  • 2 pcs. fresh large red tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 cup red onions, chopped small
  • 3 tbsps. ginger, cubed thinly
  • 1 pc. medium lemon
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 small pack maggi magic sarap
  • aluminum foil for wrapping

Cooking Procedure

  1. Squeeze lemon all over the fish, and sprinkle salt and pepper.
  2. Mix all the chopped tomatoes, onions & ginger, season with maggi magic sarap.
  3. Lay aluminum foil (dimension around 8 x 12 inches or just enough to wrap the fish) Layer on it the tomatoes, onions and ginger mixture. Place on it 1 portion fillet and top the fish with the tomatoes, onions and ginger mixture. Fold and seal the sides of the foil properly so it will be air tight.
  4. Do the same with the remaining two portions of fillet.
  5. Place over the grill and broil it for 15 minutes on each side. You can open to check if fish is well done.
  6. Place the fish with the foil on the serving plate.
  7. Serve hot with rice and soy sauce with lemon as dipping sauce. Enjoy!

Grilled Salmon Fillets

Moms and wifys, let’s start the BER month from light to lifted spirits by trying some simple recipe yet healthy and flavorful. Salmon is delicious by itself and a great fish for the grill. For this dish I gave all the credits to Linda Campbell Melton who had shared her recipe. I commend you also prepare this simple soy sauce and brown sugar marinade, with hints of lemon and garlic. These are the perfect sweet-salty complement to rich and tender salmon fillets. Yumminess! Sure you’ll love it too…happy Sunday 🙂
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Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup warm water
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 1/2 lbs. salmon fillets, with skin
  • I teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper

Cooking Procedure

  1. In a small bowl, stir together lemon juice, soy sauce, brown sugar, water, and olive oil until the sugar is dissolved.
  2. Season fillets with garlic powder, salt, and pepper.
  3. Place the lemon mixture and fillets in a ziplock bag, and let marinate in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours.
  4. Preheat grill to medium heat. Lightly oil grill grate.
  5. Place salmon fillets on the grill and cook for 6-7 minutes on each side or until fish flakes easily with a fork.
  6. Serve hot with side dish like steamed veggies and or steamed rice. Enjoy!
This entry was posted on September 1, 2013. 1 Comment